“They Don’t Know How To Be With Us”

DSCN0105The atmosphere in Kiran Village*, Madhopur, near Varanasi is amazing. The formally barren landscape is covered with trees and purpose-built buildings and the little paths are busy with boys and girls and young men and women on crutches, with wheelchairs or just plain wobbly, making their way from the gate to their class-rooms, the production units or the therapy rooms. Just a half a mile down the road is the Ganga, flowing slowly and low at this time of the year and with broad, sandy banks.

I had met Promila Charan some years before, she works in Kiran Village as the PA to the Director. The last time I saw her was a few days before she was flying off to Europe. I was longing to find out how she enjoyed the trip and also to know more about her life as a Christian professional with disabilities. Long after the children and staff had gone home Promila directed her wheelchair into the guest house, transferred herself to a more comfortable chair and we began to talk.

Quite soon into our conversation Promila said

“Read the Bible and see for yourself Jesus came for the weak and poor. Even if we have disabilities we are part of the church. We all have a purpose.”

Of course she is right but she also added

“Pastors don’t really know how to care for us, how to be with us”

It was something I had heard from the wife of another person with disabilities who told me that the new minister in the church seemed to patronise her husband and did not seem to know how to behave with him.

So what is happening here? I would like to suggest that Church ministers, like many other people in larger society, haven’t a clue about disability. They are unsure what it means to be a person in a wheelchair, or someone who is visually or hearing impaired and it is hugely puzzling to know how to be with someone who has the odd movements of a person with cerebral palsy or idiosyncrasies of autism. Yet we need our pastors to be able to serve the whole Christian community whether they have disabilities or not.

Engage Disability has produced a Disability Inclusion Toolkit packed with sensible suggestions and explanations on how church can respond to disability. If anyone reading this would like to know more about training to make your church more responsive to disability then please send an e-mail to sylvia.engagedisability@gmail.com

A good approach might be to emulate the attitude of Promila’s parents. Promila is the last of several children. Her father was a highly educated freedom fighter and much respected in general society; he loved his youngest daughter dearly and always encouraged her to try things “you can do it” was something both her parents told her often. So it was that she went on to do a Masters degree in Economics, the only girl with disabilities out of 500 in her year. In my blog last week I mentioned that George Abraham was also set in the right direction by parents who never held him back but allowed him out on a bike and kept him in normal school, collaborating with the teachers for his wellbeing.

For church leaders, the example of these parents, matching as it does Jesus’ attitude, is a fine model to follow. A great place to start in improving your response to people with disabilities is to treat them as you would other members of the congregation. If you do not usually patronise members of your congregation then you do not need to do so to one in a wheelchair. People with disabilities have fears and doubts and worries just as everyone else and they need the love and support of church members and leaders too. They have spiritual needs to be addressed and may have a heart to serve the congregation and gifts that church leaders need to learn about. And finally, as people with disabilities they may have particular concerns that they would be glad to share with church leaders for prayer and support; they will not feel able to share if they are not welcomed in the same way as everyone else.

Promila said that she had heard about a job in Kiran from a member of her church, someone kind enough to think of sharing the opportunity which has changed her life. George met his wife first at Sunday school and later they hung out with a crowd of young Christians at university.

Both George and now Promila, have attributed their successes in life to parents who encouraged them. A lesson there for church leaders too. Find out the challenges and then be an encouragement. A few words here, the knowledge that they are prayed for, news of an opportunity, and a chance to serve in church are all practical encouragements.

We might also give a thought to parents and family members living with disability. Promila told me that one of her regrets was that both parents died before she started work in Kiran. She knew they would have been pleased for her. Congregation members and church leaders must take the time to support parents of children with disabilities. They have all the usual fears and worries of parents plus a few extra as they wonder about care-giving after they grow old or die and as they try and juggle the needs of children with and without disabilities (it is not at all easy to be the sibling of a person with disability).

It is recorded in Luke 14:15-24 that Jesus said

“Bring in everyone who is poor or crippled or blind or lame”

Crippled and lame are not the sort of words we use now because people with disabilities have asked us not to, but the message is clear, the kingdom of God is for all and when we miss out those living with disability we are being disobedient.

Promila did eventually get around to telling me that she had the most wonderful six weeks in Europe. She visited Switzerland, Italy and Ireland, stayed in people’s homes and spoke in churches. She could travel in public buses because they are designed to receive wheelchairs. When she returned to India she found herself thinking

“When will we make public places accessible in India?”

A great question really. Would Promila be able to speak in your church or is it inaccessible for someone in a wheelchair or using using crutches? ….. but that is for another blog post.

*Kiran village is the location for Kiran-Society a Centre for Inclusive Rehabilitation Click here to know more 

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“I Can Always Ask”

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If it is true as I mentioned in my last post, that we are all vulnerable, all dependent on others and indeed God, for who we are and how we can live in this world then there is a commonality between all people, those with disabilities and those without. It is at that point of vulnerability that compassion is possible. It is not a superficial attitude that says “there but for the grace of God go I”, rather it is a deep understanding that if I wish for a full place in society, if I long to be loved and need to be accepted then so do others and if I am hurt by rejection or being considered inadequate then others too will equally feel the pain of rejection or exclusion and resent being written off as useless.

George Abraham is a most accomplished man; he is musical, a cricket wizard and experienced CEO who has founded and run organisations and seen that they achieve sustainability before handing them over. He is an events organiser, public speaker and a Christian leader, and has a delightful sense of humour, he also happens to be visually impaired. I have known him for a few years and long since realised he was talented. I met his wife Roopa much later at a lovely lunch they hosted for me in their home. She knew George when they were children in Sunday School, lost touch as parents were posted and then met up with him again as a student in Delhi at which point she decided that he would make a great match. She said what she saw was a handsome, intelligent and accomplished, Christian man and she told her parents that she was fond of him. George’s father, on the other hand, was having to battle George saying he did not wish to be defined by his disability so his parents should not accept proposals from people with disabilities. As an aside it is a great testimony to share that George’s Dad said it would be his prayer that the Father would “send the proposal to his door” which is exactly what happened with a re-routed letter from Roopa’s parents suggesting they should meet up.

The reason that I tell this story here is because although George has a full and fine life he is the first to admit his vulnerability not as a sign of weakness but as a fact. He was as daring as any youngster even riding his bike around the colony where they lived and his love of cricket was based on bodyline bowling…

”I would aim for the haze at the far end of my vision and it was either a wicket or hospital for the batsman!”

But he is the first to admit that the derring-do of youth was matched by the practical application of his Mum collaborating with teachers, opening the house to his childhood friends for shared homework etc. He described himself as outgoing with lots of great friends so he was always surrounded by sighted boys and girls growing up. He used the word collaboration a lot. And it is a great word for that is what we all do through life, collaborate with others to get things done, because we cannot do them alone.

 In 1 Cor. 12:21-26 Paul is talking about how the body (the Church) is made up of many parts.

21 The eye cannot say to the hand, “I don’t need you!” And the head cannot say to the feet, “I don’t need you!” 22 On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, 23 and the parts that we think are less honourable we treat with special honour. And the parts that are unpresentable are treated with special modesty, 24 while our presentable parts need no special treatment. But God has put the body together, giving greater honour to the parts that lacked it, 25 so that there should be no division in the body, but that its parts should have equal concern for each other. 26 If one part suffers, every part suffers with it; if one part is honoured, every part rejoices with it.

I was near Delhi University North Campus a few weeks after visiting Roopa and George when I saw four visually impaired students walking together towards the metro and I was reminded of George’s comments about how his achievements are greatly influenced by the good sighted friends he has had along the way. He wished visually impaired students would reach out and make friends with the sighted students for their mutual benefit.

George had recently found himself forced to take an unscheduled long bus journey and had told the conductor he would need help to know when they had reached their destination and how to get from there to the airport. His neighbour on the bus asked why he did not travel with a companion his response was

“I can always ask for help.”

It is obvious isn’t it? I cannot tell you how many times I have felt inadequate to a task and have had to ask for help. How is that alright for me but somehow considered a weakness in a person with a disability?

So, what has any of this got to do with you as an Indian Christian reading this blog?

  • I hope it has challenged your idea of what it means to be a person with disability
  • I pray that it will bring you to your knees to thank God for reminding you that you are nothing, nothing at all without His blessing. You are vulnerable and that is the common ground you share with all men and women. We all need each other and God.
  • I trust that if you are a parent and you know any children with disabilities you will encourage your children to play with them, invite them for birthday parties, and children’s activities at home and church.
  • I hope that the next time you need to ask for help or directions you will recognise the need as one you share with people with disabilities, the elderly and children ….. and it will make you more sensitive and caring and less quick to judge.
  • I pray that if you are student you will not shy away from fellow students with disabilities because you are afraid.

You can listen to George Abraham speaking about his childhood here  https://youtu.be/e-HBnuy_BZc

I would like to apologise for originally using the logo of the World Blind Cricket Council as the opening image for this blog.  I am sorry for any confusion this may have caused.

 

 

Acknowledging Shared Vulnerability

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Recently I met a young woman in a small tribal village in Manipur about an hour’s drive from Imphal. Her name is Nengnei Kim or Kikim and she is about 34 years old. I saw her first through a side window of the lovely wooden house in the hills. As she watched us walk up the drive her high cheek bones and very thick, short, black hair, cut with a full fringe, reminded me of a picture I once saw of a dignified South American tribal women. Kikim joined us in the wood panelled sitting room crawling to and fro on her hands and knees. I was privileged to have the opportunity to ask her father about their lives with Kikim. He explained that they had thought perhaps she had received the wrong medicine for a fever as a baby but subsequently tests showed that half of her brain was nor properly formed affecting her development.

Kikim’s father told me that he thought his other children had found their sister an encouragement as she was always around them and seemed happy as they were growing up. She seems to show no other feeling but happiness was how my friend interpreted what he said to me.  When I asked him about the struggles he and his wife had faced he said that it had been hard trying to cope with the many seizures she suffered but that about ten years previously a friend had brought an evangelist home and together they had prayed and fasted and since that time Kikim had not suffered any seizures. As he spoke Kikim crawled towards him and rested her head on his knee as he gently ran a hand through her hair. It was just for a moment and then she crawled off again and sat against the wall looking around and occasionally drumming her fingers on a small side table.

As we were served tea I noticed on the mantelpiece above the magnificent fireplace a framed notice of recognition from the Baptist Church for Kikim’s father’s work organising the feast at one of the major church events that constitute a significant part of the communal life in the village. Kikim’s father said the church had helped with money for medicines and the women of the church come and pray but he seemed a little surprised at my question about the response of the church, only mentioning the evangelist much later in the conversation.

That same evening one of his sons came calling at the house where I was staying. He is a fine young man who has spent years away studying for his PhD but his heart remains in his beloved village in the hills. When I mentioned how grateful I was to his father for taking time to share something of his life with Kikim he said I think we should use reason about these things; my father thinks the prayers of an evangelist cured the seizures, I think it was just her age and medicines; she still takes medicines.” The sensible logic seemed perfectly reasonable, especially coming from such an accomplished young scientist, and I started on a few quick (and rather trite) Christian responses. Then he told me with a tinge of bitterness, that as a child he had prayed and prayed for Kikim. In that moment I glimpsed a vulnerable little boy struggling to understand why his prayers were not answered and I became aware of a deep sadness.

Thomas E. Reynolds is a Canadian theologian with a son who has autism and various other neurodevelopmental disorders. In his book Vulnerable Communion; a Theology of Disability and Hospitality, Reynolds writes that we live in a time where the value of each person is based on whether he or she is capable of being productive in the sense of able to work and be part of modern capitalism. The modern world expects and respects independence and productivity (the language we use is an indication: what was earlier called Personnel Management is now called Human Resource Management, as if each of us is so much human capital!). This way of defining normal, naturally excludes people with disabilities who therefore need healing/hiding/pitying/caring for as they somehow represent something that is out of control. It is as a result of this so called prevailing view of “normalcy” that family members of people with disabilities find themselves running a full gambit of feelings including anger, disappointment, frustration, shame, pity, fear, loneliness, revulsion, bitterness and doubt.

Reynolds shows that this ‘normal’ is nonsense because none of us are actually independent. We are born to be in community, we have been “loved into being by God” and “objectively, many people spend a great part of their lives physically dependent upon others” (…in childhood and old age, during sickness etc.)  “On a subjective level we are all dependent upon others for well-being.”   “Human beings crave worth and fear the lack of worth, so we seek recognition and welcome by those around us.”  We need other people and that neediness means we are vulnerable by being “open to being wounded.” There are many strings to this vulnerability but acknowledging that we are all vulnerable and all are interdependent will allow us to consider an alternative where communities are based “upon a vision of the common good that empowers the well-being of all, and in terms of the creative love of God who is revealed in the person and work of Jesus Christ”

It is in that new view of society represented by God’s love and endless grace, that we share in a common vulnerability as Jesus did; and the relatives of people with disabilities can hope to find how to live without experiencing the negative emotions resulting from having to deal with a world that thinks interdependence and vulnerability are weak and abnormal.

We who are church are often as deeply immersed in the worldly notions of ‘the normal’ as everyone else and so we try to ‘help’, believing our role is to pray for healing and give to charities when what is actually called for is holiness. We are called to be something different in the way that Jesus was different. We are to be people who love as Christ loved. This can be done by being available, giving and receiving love in mutual vulnerability interwoven with compassion and sympathy. Our love is to respect others just as they are, as Christ did. Christ came alongside us as a vulnerable human (God made man) and then did not judge others in the way of the world, he wished only that everyone may live and live to the fullest. The Lord’s desire for us to experience joy is boundless…he offers us eternity. Our love, therefore, shall seek to nourish the beloved’s ability to experience joy. And, just as God remains faithful in Christ and the Holy Spirit so we must remain faithful; that is not ‘doing for’ someone but ‘being there’.

This kind of holy love stands in contrast to the mistaken world view that declares Kikim is a problem needing a solution. When we condemn Kikim by the worldly notion of ‘not normal’ we deny our shared vulnerability and dependency and in so doing bring into doubt the truth of Christ’s love.

 

One Caste, One Religion, One Disease

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As Christians we can expect that church will bring about change in society, sometimes it happens in unexpected ways.

Bethany Leprosy Colony in Bapatla, A.P. is a self-settled community of people affected by leprosy many of whom spent time in the Salvation Army Evangeline Booth Leprosy Hospital just cross the main Chennai to Kolkata railway track. Prasad was one of the founder members of the community in the 1950’s and a Christian; he established the first church in Bethany. Many of the people affected by leprosy who lived in Bethany had moved there from the leprosy hospital after treatment and methods of care changed. They were unsure about returning home either because their families would not welcome them or because finding matches for siblings would be difficult. These were therefore people that felt excluded.

Anthropologist, Dr. James Staples in his book Peculiar People Amazing Lives records that the people often spoke of themselves as being “Oka kulam, oka matam, oka jabhu” or “One caste, one religion, one disease” a topic that he takes up at some length in the book. In this case the one religion is Christianity which most of them had been exposed to during their stay in mission hospitals and which they began to practice once they settled in the colony. The form of Christian practice was shaped by the protestant evangelical missionaries they met in the hospital settings and then significantly by the Lay Evangelical Fellowship (LEF) pastors who regularly visited the community to conduct the Sunday services.

Society attitudes towards leprosy can be best described by a look at a local doctor who I shall call Dr. Lakshmanarao. He confessed in the 1980’s that he was afraid to treat leprosy patients in his small private practice. He was afraid of the disease (even though he was scientifically trained) and he was afraid of the impact on his own business if he was seen caring for people with leprosy. He only changed his mind after meeting a young Christian nurse from the UK whom he considered vibrant and beautiful but who had chosen to work in the Salvation Army Leprosy Hospital. He reported:

“When I saw her I looked at my own motives for avoiding treating leprosy patients and realised they were unsound.”

He subsequently went on to serve the community for many years visiting the colony and treating people in his clinic, which continued to thrive.

At the same time a young man with leprosy who worked in the Salvation Army Hospital and later moved and worked in Bethany leprosy Colony had one hand that was disfigured as a result of leprosy. He would boldly go about his business in the local town of Bapatla but always with the affected hand hidden in his trouser pocket so as to avoid rejection or any confrontation about leprosy.

The LEF pastors were almost the only Indian visitors to the leprosy colony and their faithfulness was striking at a time when many people would have been, like Dr. Lakshmanarao, uncomfortable interacting with leprosy affected people never mind visiting the colony.

It is these LEF pastors  who together with the fervent Christians in the leprosy colony, insisted on holding an annual three day prayer meeting in Bethany which over time attracted Christians from the local villages and Bapatla town. All would meet together to listen to speakers from across India sitting under giant pandals, in the open space in front of the community hall right in the centre of the leprosy colony. Those prayer meetings brought outsiders into the village in a manner that had not been seen before indeed in the one year a group of pastors travelled from Mumbai and stayed in the colony guest house.

Here then, is the societal change that I mentioned at the start of this blogpost. There were no walls around Bethany Leprosy Colony, they were not necessary as no one really wanted to come there but the response of the LEF pastors were in part instrumental in breaking down the invisible walls of fear and exclusion which have disappeared from the colony now.

The Bethany example proves to me that Christians, by their behaviour, can effect change in society which is why it is so vital that church in India leads the way in its response to disability, providing a model of inclusion that not only allows all people to learn about Christ but which others can emulate.

 

So when do we care?

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If at all you ever think about disabilities what direction do your thoughts take? I guess it might depend on your circumstances and time of life. If you are about to become a parent you might find yourself praying for a hale and hearty baby and doing everything in your power to ensure that you protect your unborn baby from the risk of disabilities. Babies and toddlers need vaccinating against the worst of childhood diseases like polio and measles. Parents of youngsters constantly worry about their propensity for climbing and speed and the associated risk of injury from accidents. Later there may well be a whole slew of years when the idea of disabilities never enters your head…you and your children are sensible, and safe and have got by very well until now. But then comes old age, failing eye sight, a realisation that you are not hearing as well as before, stiffness and perhaps even some of the nastier illnesses of later life like Parkinson’s disease or a stroke that leaves you unable to move on one side; chronic arthritis or dizziness and falls resulting in broken bones and difficult rehabilitation.

So when do we as church need to care about our response to people with disabilities? I was wondering how the man with the withered hand in Mathew 12:9-13 became like that and also the ten people with leprosy in Luke 17:11-19, do you think they contracted leprosy as children or had to leave their homes and jobs as adults? We are told that the man in John 9 was born blind and there are loads more examples in scripture that should get us thinking. I always have a chuckle at Ecclesiastes 12 with its vivid description of decrepit old age.

If there are all these possibilities then perhaps we should be getting our response to disabilities sorted out now. Maybe church does have a responsibility to be informed and open and welcoming to all people with disabilities because at any moment it could be us who become a disability statistic. I would not wish to be left out. As a young parent of a child with disabilities I would feel so sad if my child could not go out with the rest of the children for Sunday School or if I could not come to church at all because there was no one available to care for my child whose disabilities preclude him from attending church. As a young adult on crutches or in a wheelchair I want as much fun with the youth group as anyone else. And as a faithful member of a congregation for many years I do not want to find myself unable to receive communion because I can’t climb the stairs or be unable to join the singing of hymns because the words on the screen are not clear enough to read and there is no large printout for me to read in my seat.

In church recently I found myself sitting next to the father of one of my friends who is visiting for a while. I know he has become deaf in his old age and I was acutely aware that he could not always understand what was being said. I wondered what we could have done to make the service easier for him to follow. The notice sheet handed to everyone as they enter was especially helpful that week as it included not just the scripture portion but also an outline of the message, so he could have followed that if he had wished to. If the verses used to lead us into a time of worship and confession had been displayed on the screen it would have been helpful. These are small changes that would be fairly easy to implement as a routine.

Before posting this blog I had a chance to ask my friend’s father about his experience in our church. He did not answer my question but told me instead that he had recently visited a home for children with disabilities run by The Missionaries of Charity sisters. He said he had asked if the children could hear and when he found out that they could he got permission to sing with them and share a Gospel message. That elderly man has been an enthusiastic Christian and evangelist for many years, church in India needs such people, we do not want to lose their wisdom and experience for the want of a little thoughtfulness and imagination in the way we make services inclusive for everyone.

 

 

 

 

Salt and Light or not?

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The conversation between Joan and her boss went something like this:-

Joan: “Did you enjoy the Mother’s Day service in church this morning, I see you have a lovely posy of flowers?”

Boss: “No, not really as they will insist on letting the “retarded” children from that home down the road attend church. They really should not do that.”

When I heard about that conversation I was reminded of a different occasion when a nursing friend found herself in a hospital lift accompanying a badly burned and disfigured little girl with disabilities. Another passenger in the lift loudly proclaimed “Such people should not be let out.”

The stories sound almost the same don’t they? Children with disabilities being scorned by women for being out in general society. But there is a difference; Joan’s boss was Christian, we do not know about the woman in the lift. It was hard to spot that difference though. Does it matter?

The way we see and behave towards other people in society must be shaped by our being Christian so it is worth looking at what should drive that difference.

Scripture tells us we are all made in God’s image (Gen.1:26). John Wyatt* says “that God has chosen no other image bearer, either animate or inanimate on planet earth.” If you look in a mirror what you see is an image, or a reflection of yourself. There is no reflection without the mirror. So it is for us, we reflect God’s image. We are dependent as without God there is no image.

John Wyatt continues by reminding us that unlike secular thinking “in Christian thought the dignity of a human resides not in what you can do, but in what you are, by creation. Human beings do not need to earn the right to be treated as godlike beings. Our dignity is intrinsic.” If it is true for me as a human being then it is true for all human beings including of course, those with disabilities.

So, as Christians the way we respond when we are confronted with disability can be perfectly reasoned; here we have another human being and since all human beings and only human beings, are made in the image of God they must be treated as godlike beings, with all that implies.

My way of dealing with people has tended to be shaped by Luke 6:31 which teaches to “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” It is of course precious scripture. But, I am flawed, and I live amongst similarly flawed people so I could be hurting and may have been treated badly and be incapable of recognising how I should be to others. By contrast, the God in whose image we are all made is perfect and the different kinds of people I meet are a reflected image of the perfect God. Since they are godlike they are obviously fully worthy to receive the very best of me. And the very best of me is manifested in the fruits of the spirit (Gal 5:22) – love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness and gentleness as well as acceptance of people just as they are.

You might remember reading about Shreya in an earlier blog, she has Downs Syndrome and attends DBF South Church in Delhi. To mark International Day for People with Disabilities (IDPwD) Shreya was invited to read John 3:16 during the church service. She was accompanied by her Mum who pointed out the words one by one as Shreya read them. At the end she belted out heartily “Jesus Christ loves you.” The church family responded joyfully and afterwards many members of the congregation greeted and congratulated her. Including Shreya in the service and praising and encouraging her and her parents is an illustration of the difference that will make people say that they know we are Christians by our love.

*John Wyatt: “The New Biotechnology” in Issues Facing Christians Today by John Stott.

 

Angels can change tyres too

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Statistics for the number of vehicles in Delhi are staggeringly, somewhere in the region of 8 million.  Now if you have ever been caught in a jam it sometimes seems as if at least half of those cars and motorbikes are somewhere between you and where you want to go.  Often, on my way to work I see people gently pushing parked cars one a little this way and the one in front a little that way until the double parked cars inside can be manoeuvred out.   This mass of vehicles, causing traffic jams and parking nightmares are a terrible nuisance but for some they can be life changing.

Researching for this blog I was privileged to meet Mr. Inderjit lal here in Delhi.  He was affected by measles as a child of about eight and was left paralysed with no sensation below the waist.

“There was no measles vaccine in those days and what happened to me was anyway very rare. I was bed-ridden for six months after which the sensation gradually began to return.   I had the support of a marvellous doctor and physiotherapist who never lost hope. Dr Bhanu Shankar later went on to be Director General of Health Services to The Government of India and it was he who told me when I was 18 that I should get a driving licence when everyone else was saying I was off my rocker to even try. I feel God has been very good to me, sending me such committed people.”

“As a young man I was able to climb two flights of stairs and as long as I could drive I could get to most places. I worked in tourism for 25 years and used to drive a normal car.   About 40 years ago I asked the Lord to help me and be with me on any venture and I have felt his presence, so I was as confident as the next person about getting around.”

“Years ago when our children were only about 1 and 3 years old we were piled in the car late one winter evening coming back from celebrating a birthday.  I was driving and just before the Kidwai Nagar and AAIMS junction (that was in the days before the flyovers) we got a flat tyre.  I could drive but I could not change a tyre and so there we were, Rita, me and two little ones in the cold and dark with no one around. Suddenly out of the gloom comes a young man whom we did not recognise but who declared that he knew us. It seems he was the son of a former servant and he was willing and able to change the tyre and send us on our way.  We know that was God’s good grace and was the reason why I had such confidence in spite of the limitations caused by the disability.”

“I made sure my children could drive and stopped driving myself a few years ago mostly because now there are so many more cars and it is almost impossible to park close to places that I need to visit and I cannot walk far.”

It doesn’t sound much really does it? But giving up driving has narrowed Inderjit’s world and increased his dependence on others.

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Of course in a city like Delhi it is perhaps madness to consider the luxury of reserved parking for people with disabilities.  I did see a “disability parking” sign outside a row of shops on Aurobindo Marg recently but somehow I can’t imagine it is reserved only for people with disabilities.  Lots of congregations across India meet not in special church buildings but in schools and public auditorium so my conversation with Inderjit got me thinking that it would be fairly easy to make a portable “disability parking” sign and have a young church member set it up each week to keep parking spaces close to the meeting place especially for people with disabilities. Of course for those mainline churches that have their own parking it is would be a simple matter to rule up special parking places close to the church entrance and the nearest ramp into the building.  Ah but ramps are for another blog post!

I would like to thank Inderjit Lal and his wife Rita for sharing so freely with me their journey as Christians living with disability. I remain deeply impressed and am sure you will be hearing more about them in future blogs